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How Fast Does Squamous Cell Cancer Grow

How Fast Does Squamous Cell Cancer Grow
How fast does squamous cell cancer grow - SCC is a skin cancer that grows slowly. Unlike other types of skin cancer, it can spread to tissue, bones and nearby lymph nodes, where it may become difficult to treat. When they are caught early it is easily treated. SCC is the second most common form of skin cancer and is especially noticeable in people with chronic sun exposure. It is important to recognize this form of skin cancer because it can spread to other parts of the body and can damage the local life. It is usually observed in whites and older people who have prolonged exposure to sunlight. Other risk factors for the development of SCC are: male gender, exposure to chemical carcinogens (such as arsenic and tar), immunosuppression, ionizing radiation, scarring, infection with some subtypes of HPV and history of other skin cancers.

SCC is typically moderate developing a tumor that has a tendency to develop without physical side effects. Be that as it may, a few types of this disease can rapidly develop and hurt, particularly when the sore is vast. They can get irritated and bleed. As a rule, the lesion is flesh colored pink spots that may have on a scale and crust. Some may look like warts, especially close to the fingers, and some can look like horns on it. Most cases occur in the head and neck but also occurs in the upper extremities and other areas exposed to the sun. How fast does squamous cell cancer grow - SCC, which appears on the lips can look as good as new red relief or red and the bark in a dry place that exists. High-risk cancer, which will be distributed include the lips, ears, and nose. (See Also: Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma Skin Cancer)

How fast does squamous cell cancer grow - People should regularly conduct a self-test, and if someone notices that the lesions are developing or do not heal should consult their dermatologist. Many treatment options exist depending on the size, location, and characteristics of SCC, as well as from the patient's profile. To remove the SCC can be used surgical removal of or surgical Micrograph Mohs (the method used by a trained dermatologist). Other treatment options include cryotherapy (the freezing point) ED & C (the grinding and combustion), laser and radiation. Sun protection is the most important factor in preventing SCC. However, diligent self-examination and visit a dermatologist can be very important in its treatment and prevention.